News and Resources

Love-Your-Eyes-This-Valentine.jpg

February 7, 2019 Article

Your eye health is our top priority at Northwest Eye Surgeons and since February is a month to celebrate love, why not show some love to your eyes? Keep reading for some tips and tricks to keep your eyes happy and healthy.

Eat Right. According to the American Optometric Association and the American Academy of Ophthalmology, adding certain nutrients to your daily diet can be good for your vision. Foods rich in lutein, omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, zinc, and vitamins C and E are great for your eye health. These nutrients have been linked to reducing the risk of certain eye diseases and can lower the risk of age-related eye issues.

Foods that are best for eye health:

  • Fish
  • Nuts and legumes
  • Seeds
  • Citrus fruits
  • Leafy green vegetables
  • Carrots
  • Sweet potatoes

Exercise. We all know that exercise has many health benefits, but did you know that it’s also good for your eyes? Many studies over the years have indicated that regular exercise can reduce the risk for common eye diseases such as cataracts, wet age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Additionally, exercise helps avoid health issues that aren’t primarily related to eye health but can damage your eyes such as type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure.

Use Basic Eye Protection at Work. According to Prevent Blindness, more than 2,000 people injure their eyes at work each day. The right eye protection could lessen the severity or event prevent 90% of eye injury accidents in the workplace. We encourage you to know the eye safety dangers at your place of work and use the proper protection.

Get an Annual Eye Exam. We cannot stress the importance of an annual eye exam enough! Not only should you get an eye exam to evaluate how well you can see, but it is important to check your overall eye health. Some diseases, such as Glaucoma, can show no symptoms or early warning signs. By the time people notice a difference in their vision, the disease may be in a much more advanced stage. Contact our office at (614) 451-7750 or fill out our appointment request form to schedule your eye exam today.

What to do if You Sustain an Eye Injury. When an eye injury occurs, you should seek medical help from an ophthalmologist or another doctor as soon as possible, even if the injury seems minor. Additionally, there are simple steps you can take to prevent further damage:

  • Don’t touch or rub the injured eye
  • Don’t apply ointment or medication
  • Place a shield or gauze over the eye until you visit a doctor
  • If there appears to be an object embedded in the eye, don’t try to remove it
  • Use water to flush out the eye

Winter-Dry-Eye.jpg

January 25, 2019 Tips

The winter season is in full swing! While that comes with many wonderful white, snowy sceneries and fun-filled holidays, it also comes with increased cold and flu symptoms. This can make it extremely important to look after your health during this time of year. There’s another part of your body you need to think about protecting, your eyes.

How the winter affects your eyes

 Our most precious sense is often under attack during the winter season in more ways than one. For instance, snow and ice is extremely reflective. This means the sun’s UV rays can reach your eyes from both below and above you, which puts you at greater risk for damaging your eyes. Additionally, in extreme weather, you might find it hard to fully open your eyes while also feeling a burning sensation. In conditions like this, it is possible for your cornea to freeze, which can be very painful and lead to issues with light sensitivity and blurry vision. Another common winter eye issue is excessive tearing; excessive tearing can cause your vision to become blurry which is a common, yet frustrating issue.

One of the most common winter eye issues though is dry eye. Cold temperatures can cause your eyes to lose their natural moisture and become dry, leaving them sore and uncomfortable. Although this condition is not usually serious, there are easy steps you can take to ease your discomfort and keep your eyes healthy this winter!

 

Common symptoms of dry eye

Watch for these common warning signs of dry eye:

  • Redness
  • Burning sensation
  • Irritated, scratchy feeling
  • Glassy luster to the eye, blurred vision

 

Tips for protecting your eyes in winter

Treating your eyes right in the winter can be easy! Follow these tips in order to make sure your eyes are as healthy as possible this season:

Lower the temperature in rooms. High temperatures can cause your tears to evaporate, causing dry eye.

Wear sunglasses! If you’re spending time outdoors on a cold, windy day, wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from dryness, harmful UV light, and burning eyes.

Drink more fluids. Staying hydrated is one of the best things you can do to help your body fight off dry eyes. Consider increasing your daily intake of fluids during the winter months.

Use a warm washcloth. A warm, damp compress can actually help your eyes with tear secretion. Do this for two to three minutes per eye to help your eyes create moisture and become less irritated.

Use eye drops. Over the counter or prescription, eye drops can significantly reduce the symptoms of dry eye.

 

If you still can’t seem to kick your dry eye, make an appointment with us online or call us at (614) 451-7550. At Northwest Eye Surgeons, your healthy eyes are our priority.


Eyeware-Safety.jpg

March 7, 2019 Uncategorized

In anticipation of March Madness this year, we decided this is the perfect time to put the spotlight on eye safety because as always, your eye safety and health is our top priority at Northwest Eye Surgeons.

According to a study published in the journal Pediatrics, basketball is the leading cause of sports-related eye injuries in the United States followed by baseball and softball. The study also lists the most common types of sports eye injuries: corneal abrasion (27.1%), conjunctivitis (10.0%) and foreign body in the eye (8.5%). Most of these injuries can be treated and released but some of the more serious injuries can lead to hospitalization.

How to Avoid Sports-Related Eye Injuries.

Most sports-related eye injuries can be easily prevented with one simple solution – wearing eye protection. Protective eyewear made with polycarbonate lenses is the best choice for basketball players. All eyewear worn by athletes should meet the requirements of the appropriate organizations.

Professional Athletes Who Have Sustained Eye Injuries.

Sports-related eye injuries can happen in a split second and have the possibility of lasting a lifetime. Here are some real-life examples of preventable eye injuries during basketball. 

If you have any questions or concerns regarding eye protection or eye health, feel free to give us a call at (614) 451-7550 or schedule an appointment online.


Glaucoma-Awareness.jpg

January 15, 2019 Uncategorized

You might be surprised to hear that January is Glaucoma Awareness Month. Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in the United States. Most people are unaware that glaucoma has no symptoms in its early stages. If detected early enough, glaucoma can usually be controlled. It is very important to us here at Northwest Eye Surgeons for everyone to be educated and informed about glaucoma and to get tested. 

What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that damage the eye’s optic nerve and can result in vision loss and blindness. Glaucoma affects peripheral (side) vision, narrowing the field of vision. The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that connect the retina to the brain. Damage to the optic nerve is caused by increased pressure from fluids that build up inside the eye. A healthy optic nerve is crucial for good vision.

Statistics and Facts about Glaucoma.

  • It is estimated that over 3 million Americans have glaucoma but only half of those are aware of it
  • Glaucoma accounts for 9-12% of blindness in the United States
  • African Americans are 15 times more likely to be visually impaired from glaucoma
  • The most common form of glaucoma is open-angle glaucoma
  • Some forms of glaucoma have virtually no symptoms

 

Who is at Risk for Glaucoma?

Anyone can get glaucoma but there are some people who are at higher risk

  • African Americans over the age of 40
  • Everyone over the age of 60, especially Mexican Americans
  • People with a family history of disease, especially glaucoma

 

How to Prevent Glaucoma?

The best way to prevent glaucoma is getting a comprehensive dilated eye exam. This exam will examine:

  • Tonometry: The inner eye pressure
  • Ophthalmoscopy: The shape and color of the optic nerve
  • Perimetry: The complete field of vision
  • Gonioscopy: The angle in the eye where the iris meets the cornea
  • Pachymetry: The thickness of the cornea

 

How is Glaucoma Treated?

There is no cure for glaucoma yet, but it can be treated and managed if caught early enough. Treatments include medications, laser surgery, and traditional surgery. Contact our office at (614) 451-7750 or fill out our appointment request form to schedule your eye exam today.


Good-Vision.jpg

November 1, 2018 Article

Foods to eat this holiday season that are good for your sight!

There are so many things to be thankful for this time of year—family, friends, good health, and, of course, good eyesight. Eyesight can be impacted by many factors, but people are often surprised by how important a role diet plays in your continued eye health. However, nutrients such as zinc, vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene may reduce your chances of age-related eye diseases by up to 25%.1

For example, Lutein is found in many common foods and is said to reduce the risk of age-related macular disease, the leading cause of blindness in seniors.2 Vitamin C and vitamin A also make the list of important nutrients for eye health. One study showed that women who ingested more vitamins A and C had a reduced chance for developing glaucoma.3 And, of course, there are carotenes, the magical ingredient of carrots that make them so wonderful for eyesight.

To keep your eyes healthy and happy this winter, dig into these dishes with gusto knowing they are giving you the vitamins and nutrients you need to avoid eye problems and have sharp vision for years to come.

Sweet Potatoes

Whether you serve them whole, mashed, with marshmallow topping, or in a sweet potato pie, sweet potatoes are full of eye-helping nutrients. They have vitamin E, an anti-oxidant, and beta-carotene, the same healthy ingredient in carrots. (Note: marshmallow topping is not known to promote eye health, but boy is it delicious.)

Collard Greens

This dark green vegetable will do wonders for your eye health. It contains high levels of lutein and zeaxanthin, both of which reduce the risk of age-related eye diseases.

Nuts

There are plenty of opportunities to add a few nuts to your holiday dinner spread—and I’m not just talking about inviting over your relatives. Consider adding finely chopped walnuts to your stuffing. Or you can serve them up in cookie form. The nutrients in nuts are fantastic for promoting good eye health.

Carrots

We can’t mention eye health and food without mentioning carrots. Those amazing beta-carotenes will be helping your eyes whether you eat carrots raw on the appetizer buffet or cooked as a side dish for the main meal.

Pumpkin

While carrots may have high levels of beta-carotene, pumpkin has even higher levels. That means every slice of pumpkin pie will be helping protect your eyes from disease and degeneration. There’s never been a better excuse to go back for a second helping of dessert.

 

Don’t just use the holidays as a time to protect your eye health. Eating healthy and maintaining an active lifestyle throughout the year is critical to receiving the long-term benefits and protections for your eyes that come from important nutrients. For more information, talk to your ophthalmologist today.

 


Northwest-Eye-Surgeons-Allergies.jpg

May 25, 2017 Video
This allergy season has been a rough one for most of us! If your nose isn’t bothering you, your eyes sure are! Lucky for you, eyes are our specialty. Dr. Rogers is going to share some tips on how to keep the irritation down and ride out the rest of the season in a little more comfort. Watch his short segment on eye allergy relief and learn what you can do to reduce irritation. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask. You can reach us at (614) 451 – 7550.

NWES-Eyecare-Tips.jpg

May 20, 2017 Tips

Moms-to-be know their bodies are going to go through a lot of changes over their pregnancy.  Many do not realize that their vision can also be affected.

Blood pressure, water retention, and hormone changes can all affect vision for a short amount of time. Fluid retention can even affect the shape of the cornea, changing how vision is seen through glasses and contacts. It is common for women to end up more nearsighted than before.

Below, are 5 ways to help keep moms-to-be eyes in good shape.

  1. Dry Eye: Make sure to ask your doctor before using any over-the-counter solutions. Some solutions could include ingredients that are not good to use during pregnancy. For contacts, try wearing your glasses every other day to help reduce dryness. Even simply blinking more can help.
  2. Puffiness: Puffiness can be caused by retaining water. A cold washcloth or ice pack placed on closed eyes can very helpful to reduce swelling. It is also helpful to splash cold water onto your face. Increase the amount of water you drink to help lower water retention. You can also reduce the amount of caffeine and sodium you intake.
  3. Tell Your Doctor: Let us know! If you have an appointment scheduled with us during your pregnancy, let us know ahead of time. The doctor may choose not to dilate you at this time.
  4. Extra Eye Exams:If you happen to be diabetic, pregnancy can increase the effects. It is a good idea to have your eyes checked more often.
  5. Glaucoma: Eye pressure can also be affected by pregnancy, possibly even for the better. You may be able to lower your prescription drug dosage, which is overall better for your pregnancy.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask. You can reach us at (614) 451 – 7550.


© 2019 Northwest Eye Surgeons | Site Designed by The Media Captain